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Consumerism

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Consumerism, a critical phenomenon in our society, has a rich historical development and significant cultural, environmental, and social implications. Beginning in the late 17th century, it marked the shift from a need-based to desire-driven society. The term encapsulates the increasing demand[2] for luxury goods, intensified by the Industrial Revolution and the evolution of marketplaces into social hubs. It also covers the influence of advertising[1] on consumer[3] behavior. However, consumerism has been criticized for its detrimental effects on the environment, such as resource overconsumption and waste generation, and its contribution to social inequality. Modern consumerism highlights the pursuit of material wealth and social status, seen in changing cultural values and the rise of emerging consumer markets like China.

Terms definitions
1. advertising. Advertising is a form of communication used to inform or persuade an audience, often with the goal of selling a product or service. Its history dates back to ancient civilizations, where Egyptians used papyrus for sales messages, and wall paintings were used in ancient Asia, Africa, and South America for promotional purposes. The medium evolved over time, from print in newspapers to audio-visual and digital mediums, with the rise of mass media and technological advancements. Advertising strategies can vary, aiming to raise awareness or drive sales, and can target different audiences on a local, national, or global scale. Various methods include print, radio, web banners, and television ads, among others. New trends have emerged in the advertising business models, like guerrilla marketing and interactive ads. The role of women in advertising has also been notable, with their insights being valued due to their purchasing power.
2. demand.
1 "Demand" is a foundational concept in the field of economics that refers to the quantity of a specific good or service that consumers are willing and able to purchase at different price points within a given period. It is largely influenced by the price of the commodity, the cost of related goods, personal disposable income, individual tastes and preferences, and consumer expectations about future prices and availability. The relationship between demand and its influencing factors is visually represented by a demand curve on a graph. The concept also extends to different types of goods demand, including negative demand and latent demand, and how these can be managed strategically. The elasticity of demand, another crucial aspect, measures the sensitivity of demand to price changes. Lastly, the market structure can notably impact the demand faced by individual firms.
2 "Demand" is an economic term that refers to the amount of a product or service that consumers are willing and able to buy at a certain price. This concept is influenced by various factors such as the price of the commodity, the price of related goods, personal disposable income, tastes and preferences, and consumer expectations about future prices or income. Demand is often represented graphically through a demand curve which shows the relationship between price and quantity. The concept of price elasticity of demand measures the sensitivity of the quantity demanded to price changes. Market structures and types of goods also influence the shape of the demand curve and the nature of demand. Additionally, demand management strategies are used to control economic demand to avoid recession. Understanding demand is crucial for both businesses and policy makers as it plays a vital role in economic forecasting, pricing decisions, and planning production.
3 "Demand" is a foundational concept in the field of economics that refers to the quantity of a specific good or service that consumers are willing and able to purchase at different price points within a given period. It is largely influenced by the price of the commodity, the cost of related goods, personal disposable income, individual tastes and preferences, and consumer expectations about future prices and availability. The relationship between demand and its influencing factors is visually represented by a demand curve on a graph. The concept also extends to different types of goods demand, including negative demand and latent demand, and how these can be managed strategically. The elasticity of demand, another crucial aspect, measures the sensitivity of demand to price changes. Lastly, the market structure can notably impact the demand faced by individual firms.
Consumerism (Wikipedia)

Consumerism is a social and economic order in which the aspirations of many individuals include the acquisition of goods and services beyond those necessary for survival or traditional displays of status. It emerged in Western Europe before the Industrial Revolution and became widespread around 1900. In economics, consumerism refers to policies that emphasize consumption. It is the consideration that the free choice of consumers should strongly orient the choice by manufacturers of what is produced and how, and therefore orient the economic organization of a society. Consumerism has been criticized by both individuals who choose other ways of participating in the economy (i.e. choosing simple living or slow living) and environmentalists concerned about its impact on the planet. Experts often assert that consumerism has physical limits, such as growth imperative and overconsumption, which have larger impacts on the environment. This includes direct effects like overexploitation of natural resources or large amounts of waste from disposable goods and significant effects like climate change. Similarly, some research and criticism focuses on the sociological effects of consumerism, such as reinforcement of class barriers and creation of inequalities.

An electronics store in a shopping mall in Jakarta, Indonesia (2002)
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