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Infomercial

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An infomercial is a type of advertisement that blends information with commercial content to promote a product or service. Resembling standard TV programs, these paid advertisements showcase products ranging from cleaning supplies to dietary supplements. They often feature a spokesperson[1], known as a pitchman, frequently a well-known personality, to endorse the product. Originating in the 1940s, infomercials have expanded globally and adapted to air in various time slots, sometimes replacing TV reruns. Critical to marketing strategies, their success hinges on factors such as product demonstrations, expert comments, and customer[2] testimonials. However, they’ve faced criticisms and regulations due to misleading claims, prompting consumers to scrutinize products before purchase. Despite this, infomercials continue to play a significant role in international product distribution.

Terms definitions
1. spokesperson. A spokesperson is a professional who represents an organization, tasked with conveying its messages to the public. They are typically trained in journalism, communications, public relations, or public affairs. They can be celebrities in commercial advertising or high-ranking officers, such as CEOs or presidents, in corporations. Their primary duty is to advocate for the organization's positions, even if these differ from their personal beliefs, with the aim to increase the impact of positive messages and lessen that of negative ones. In government organizations, this role is filled by Public Information Officers (PIOs) who serve as communication coordinators, supplying essential information to the public and media. This role is pivotal in various fields, including scientific communities, corporate communications, and investor relations departments.
2. customer.
1 The primary entity in this text is the "customer. A customer is an individual or entity that purchases goods or services from a business. They are crucial participants in the commercial landscape, forming relationships with businesses through transactions. Customers can also be classified as 'clients,' especially when they receive tailored advice or solutions from a business. The term 'client' originates from Latin, implying a sense of leaning or bending toward a business. Customers vary in types - from end customers who directly buy products or services, to industrial customers who incorporate these goods or services into their own offerings. These customers can have different relationships with the business, such as being employers in construction projects. Businesses often segment their customers into different categories, like entrepreneurs or end users, to better understand and serve them. The understanding and management of customer relationships is a critical area of study and practice in business.
2 The primary entity in this text is the "customer. A customer is an individual or entity that purchases goods or services from a business. They are crucial participants in the commercial landscape, forming relationships with businesses through transactions. Customers can also be classified as 'clients,' especially when they receive tailored advice or solutions from a business. The term 'client' originates from Latin, implying a sense of leaning or bending toward a business. Customers vary in types - from end customers who directly buy products or services, to industrial customers who incorporate these goods or services into their own offerings. These customers can have different relationships with the business, such as being employers in construction projects. Businesses often segment their customers into different categories, like entrepreneurs or end users, to better understand and serve them. The understanding and management of customer relationships is a critical area of study and practice in business.
Infomercial (Wikipedia)

An infomercial is a form of television commercial that resembles regular TV programming yet is intended to promote or sell a product, service or idea. It generally includes a toll-free telephone number or website. Most often used as a form of direct response television (DRTV), they are often program-length commercials (long-form infomercials), and are typically 28:30 or 58:30 minutes in length. Infomercials are also known as paid programming (or teleshopping in Europe). This phenomenon started in the United States, where infomercials were typically shown overnight (usually 1:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m.), outside peak prime time hours for commercial broadcasters. Some television stations chose to air infomercials as an alternative to the former practice of signing off, while other channels air infomercials 24 hours a day. Some stations also choose to air infomercials during the daytime hours, mostly on weekends, to fill in for unscheduled network or syndicated programming. By 2009, most infomercial spending in the U.S. occurred outside of the traditional overnight hours. Stations in most countries around the world have instituted similar media structures. The infomercial industry is worth over $200 billion.

The Washington DC-based National Infomercial Marketing Association was formed in late 1990; by 1993 "it had more than 200" members committed to standards "with teeth".

While the term "infomercial" was originally applied only to television advertising, it is now sometimes used to refer to any presentation (often on video) which presents a significant amount of information in an actual, or perceived, attempt to promote a point of view. When used this way, the term may be meant to carry an implication that the party making the communication or political speech is exaggerating truths or hiding important facts.

The New York Times cited a professional in the field as saying that "infomercial companies tend to do well during recessions."

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