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Bulletin board system

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A Bulletin Board System (BBS) is a computer-based method of communication that emerged in the late 1970s and was popular until the rise of the internet[2] in the mid-1990s. BBS was a pioneering system that allowed users to connect over a phone line using a modem to share messages, download software and games, and participate in online discussions. It was the precursor to modern online communities and social networks. The system evolved over time with the introduction of higher-speed modems and graphical user interfaces, enhancing user experience[1]. Despite a decline in popularity with the advent of the internet, BBS systems have left a lasting legacy. They have transitioned to the Internet using modern networking protocols and continue to be used in some communities.

Terms definitions
1. user experience. User Experience (UX) is a broad term that encompasses every aspect of an end-user's interaction with a company, its services, or its products. This includes users' perceptions and responses, both emotional and cognitive, during and after the use of a system, product, or service. User Experience also involves users' beliefs, preferences, and behaviors. While usability, a component of UX, focuses on the practical aspects of a system, UX incorporates a holistic view of system use. User experience is a vital factor in increasing brand loyalty and customer base growth. Its history dates back to the Machine Age, with notable contributions from figures like Frederick Winslow Taylor, Henry Ford, and Donald Norman. Today, technology advancements continue to shape and expand the field.Developer Experience (DX) is the analog of UX for software developers. It represents the experience developers have with the tools, processes, and software they use in their work. A high-quality DX can significantly impact the overall user experience, thus contributing to the success of the product. The importance of DX is increasingly recognized in the field of software services, where ease of use can serve as a key market differentiator. This concept has been explored by various authors and researchers, and it's also emphasized in international standards like ISO 9241-210, which advocates for human-centered design.
2. internet. The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks that use standardized communication protocols, primarily the TCP/IP, to link devices worldwide. Originating from the term 'internetted' used in 1849, the term 'Internet' was later used by the US War Department in 1945. Its development began with computer scientists creating time-sharing systems in the 1960s and further progressed with the establishment of ARPANET in 1969. The Internet is self-governed, without a central authority, and its principal name spaces are administered by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). It has significantly transformed traditional communication media and has grown exponentially over the years, with internet users increasing 20% to 50% annually. In 2019, over half of the world population used the Internet. The Internet protocol suite, which includes TCP/IP and four conceptual layers, guides internet packets to their destinations. Essential services like email and Internet telephony operate on the Internet. The World Wide Web, a global collection of interconnected documents, is a key component of the Internet.

A bulletin board system (BBS), also called a computer bulletin board service (CBBS), was a computer server running software that allowed users to connect to the system using a terminal program. Once logged in, the user can perform functions such as uploading and downloading software and data, reading news and bulletins, and exchanging messages with other users through public message boards and sometimes via direct chatting. In the early 1980s, message networks such as FidoNet were developed to provide services such as NetMail, which is similar to internet-based email.

A welcome screen for the Free-net bulletin board, from 1994

Many BBSes also offered online games in which users could compete with each other. BBSes with multiple phone lines often provided chat rooms, allowing users to interact with each other. Bulletin board systems were in many ways a precursor to the modern form of the World Wide Web, social networks, and other aspects of the Internet. Low-cost, high-performance asynchronous modems drove the use of online services and BBSes through the early 1990s. InfoWorld estimated that there were 60,000 BBSes serving 17 million users in the United States alone in 1994, a collective market much larger than major online services such as CompuServe.

The introduction of inexpensive dial-up internet service and the Mosaic web browser offered ease of use and global access that BBS and online systems did not provide, and led to a rapid crash in the market starting in late 1994 to early 1995. Over the next year, many of the leading BBS software providers went bankrupt and tens of thousands of BBSes disappeared. Today, BBSing survives largely as a nostalgic hobby in most parts of the world, but it is still a popular form of communication for Taiwanese youth (see PTT Bulletin Board System). Most surviving BBSes are accessible over Telnet and typically offer free email accounts, FTP services, IRC and all the protocols commonly used on the Internet. Some offer access through packet switched networks or packet radio connections.

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