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Consumer behaviour

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Consumer behaviour[1] is a complex field that revolves around how individuals or groups select, purchase, use, and dispose of goods or services. This term encapsulates the emotional, mental, and behavioural responses of consumers throughout the decision-making process. It’s a dynamic interaction between feelings, thought processes, actions, and the surrounding environment. The field considers various influences on consumer[2] decisions, from personal emotions and preferences to societal factors and opinion leaders. It delves into the stages of purchase decisions from problem recognition to post-purchase evaluation. It also considers various internal and external factors that impact these decisions. The study of consumer behaviour is crucial for understanding consumer awareness, predicting consumer trends, and forming effective marketing strategies.

Terms definitions
1. Consumer behaviour ( Consumer behaviour )
1 Consumer behaviour is a complex field that revolves around how individuals or groups select, purchase, use, and dispose of goods or services. This term encapsulates the emotional, mental, and behavioural responses of consumers throughout the decision-making process. It's a dynamic interaction between feelings, thought processes, actions, and the surrounding environment. The field considers various influences on consumer decisions, from personal emotions and preferences to societal factors and opinion leaders. It delves into the stages of purchase decisions from problem recognition to post-purchase evaluation. It also considers various internal and external factors that impact these decisions. The study of consumer behaviour is crucial for understanding consumer awareness, predicting consumer trends, and forming effective marketing strategies.
2 Consumer behaviour is a key concept in marketing that originated in the mid-20th century. It incorporates an interdisciplinary approach, focusing primarily on the behaviourist perspective. As defined by the American Marketing Association, consumer behaviour encompasses the study of how individuals make purchase decisions, their experiences during consumption, and the various factors that influence their behaviour. Predicting consumer behaviour can be challenging due to its complex nature, which involves decision-making roles and various purchasing models. The behaviour is shaped by a myriad of factors including emotions, attitudes, social groups, and personal preferences. The process of purchasing involves recognizing a problem, searching for information, evaluating alternatives, and post-purchase evaluation. Internal influences, such as personal and social identities, psychological factors, and demographic characteristics, also play a crucial role in shaping consumer behaviour. Additionally, cultural and symbolic elements significantly affect purchasing decisions. The understanding of consumer behaviour is crucial for marketers to segment their markets and tailor their strategies accordingly.
3 Consumer behaviour is a complex field that revolves around how individuals or groups select, purchase, use, and dispose of goods or services. This term encapsulates the emotional, mental, and behavioural responses of consumers throughout the decision-making process. It's a dynamic interaction between feelings, thought processes, actions, and the surrounding environment. The field considers various influences on consumer decisions, from personal emotions and preferences to societal factors and opinion leaders. It delves into the stages of purchase decisions from problem recognition to post-purchase evaluation. It also considers various internal and external factors that impact these decisions. The study of consumer behaviour is crucial for understanding consumer awareness, predicting consumer trends, and forming effective marketing strategies.
2. consumer. A consumer, in simple terms, is an individual who purchases goods or services for their personal use and not for resale or commercial purposes. They play a significant role in the economy as their demand for products motivates manufacturers to produce. This dynamic influences production, distribution, and consumption processes. Consumers also have certain rights, established by President John F. Kennedy, that include safety, information, choice, redressal, and representation. These rights protect them from hazardous goods and unfair practices. In today's digital age, consumers are evolving into 'prosumers', actively participating in product creation. Consumer behavior, therefore, has a profound impact on marketing strategies, leading to personalized marketing and mass customization.
Consumer behaviour (Wikipedia)

Consumer behaviour is the study of individuals, groups, or organisations and all the activities associated with the purchase, use and disposal of goods and services. Consumer behaviour consists of how the consumer's emotions, attitudes, and preferences affect buying behaviour. Consumer behaviour emerged in the 1940–1950s as a distinct sub-discipline of marketing, but has become an interdisciplinary social science that blends elements from psychology, sociology, social anthropology, anthropology, ethnography, ethnology, marketing, and economics (especially behavioural economics).

The Royal Saint-Hubert Galleries shopping arcade in Brussels, Belgium. Consumer behaviour, in its broadest sense, is concerned with how consumers select, decide and use goods and services.

The study of consumer behaviour formally investigates individual qualities such as demographics, personality lifestyles, and behavioural variables (such as usage rates, usage occasion, loyalty, brand advocacy, and willingness to provide referrals), in an attempt to understand people's wants and consumption patterns. Consumer behaviour also investigates on the influences on the consumer, from social groups such as family, friends, sports, and reference groups, to society in general (brand-influencers, opinion leaders).

Research has shown that consumer behaviour is difficult to predict, even for experts in the field; however, new research methods, such as ethnography, consumer neuroscience, and machine learning are shedding new light on how consumers make decisions. In addition, customer relationship management (CRM) databases have become an asset for the analysis of customer behaviour. The extensive data produced by these databases enables detailed examination of behavioural factors that contribute to customer re-purchase intentions, consumer retention, loyalty, and other behavioural intentions such as the willingness to provide positive referrals, become brand advocates, or engage in customer citizenship activities. Databases also assist in market segmentation, especially behavioural segmentation such as developing loyalty segments, which can be used to develop tightly targeted customised marketing strategies on a one-to-one basis. (Also see relationship marketing).

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